How to Calculate Full Time Employees for Health Care Reform

If you’re an employer with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees, you’re subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This means you must offer health insurance to your full-time employees or pay a penalty. But how do you calculate full-time equivalent employees?

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What is the full-time equivalent (FTE) formula?

To determine how many full-time equivalent (FTE) employees your business has, calculate the total number of hours all your part-time employees work each week, and divide that number by 30. This will give you the FTE number for your business.

How do you calculate FTEs for your business?

If you have 50 or more full-time equivalent (FTE) employees, you are considered an Applicable Large Employer (ALE) for purposes of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). To calculate your FTEs, add up the number of hours worked by all your employees in a given week and divide by 40. This will give you the number of FTEs for that week.

What are the benefits of calculating FTEs?

There are several benefits of calculating full-time equivalent (FTE) employees for health care reform. First, it allows you to determine if you are an applicable large employer (ALE), which is required for some of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Second, it helps you to determine how many employees you need to offer health insurance coverage to in order to comply with the ACA. Finally, it can help you to save money on your health insurance premiums by determining if you are eligible for the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit.

How does the Affordable Care Act (ACA) define full-time employees?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) defines a full-time employee as an individual who is employed an average of at least 30 hours per week, or 130 hours per month. The ACA uses a monthly measurement period to determine whether an employee is full-time.

If an employee is determined to be full-time for one month, they will be considered full-time for the entire following calendar year, unless they experience a significant break in service. A significant break in service is defined as a break of more than four consecutive weeks where the employee does not work at least 30 hours per week.

What is the ACA’s employer shared responsibility provision?

The Affordable Care Act’s employer shared responsibility provision requires certain employers to offer health insurance coverage to their full-time employees or pay a penalty. This provision is also sometimes referred to as the “employer mandate.”

To see if you are an applicable large employer subject to the employer shared responsibility provision, you will need to calculate your number of full-time equivalent employees (FTEs). You do this by adding together (1) the total number of hours of service for all your part-time employees for the month, and (2) dividing that sum by 120.

How can calculating FTEs help you comply with the ACA?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers to offer health insurance to full-time employees or pay a penalty. But what counts as a full-time employee? The ACA defines a full-time employee as someone who works an average of 30 hours or more per week.

If you have 50 or more full-time equivalent employees (FTEs), you are considered an Applicable Large Employer (ALE) and must comply with the ACA. To calculate your number of FTEs, you add up the total number of hours worked by all part-time employees in a week and divide by 30. You can then add this number to the total number of full-time employees you have.

For example, if you have 10 part-time employees who each work 20 hours per week, your total number of hours worked would be 200. Dividing this by 30 gives you 6.67 FTEs, which means you have a total of 16.67 FTEs when you include your 10 full-time employees. This would make you an ALE and subject to the ACA’s requirements.

If you’re not sure how many FTEs you have, there are a few ways to calculate it. You can use the IRS’ online tool, the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit Calculator, which will do the calculation for you based on the information you enter about your business and employees. Or, you can use one of the many FTE calculators available online, like this one from eHealthInsurance.

Calculating your FTEs can help ensure that you are in compliance with the ACA and avoid paying any penalties. It’s important to stay up to date on all the changes happening with health care reform so that you can make sure your business is compliant.

What other factors should you consider when calculating FTEs?

In addition to taking into account the number of hours your employees work, you should also consider the following factors when calculating FTEs:

-The type of work your employees do: Full-time employees are those who work an average of 30 hours or more per week, but some employers define full-time employees as those who work 37.5 or 40 hours per week. If you have employees who worked fewer than 30 hours per week on average, but you consider them full-time for benefits purposes, you should include them in your FTE calculation.

-The number of weeks your employees worked: Employees who only worked part of the year (for example, seasonal workers) should be included in your FTE calculation on a pro-rated basis.

-The number of days your employees worked: Employees who did not work every day of the week (for example, workers who had weekends off) should be included in your FTE calculation on a pro-rated basis.

How can you reduce your FTE count?

In order to reduce your full-time equivalent (FTE) count, you will need to use a calcuation that takes into account both full- and part-time employees. The following formula is the one most commonly used:

Number of FTEs = (Number of full-time employees + (Number of part-time employees / 2))

For example, if you have 10 full-time employees and 20 part-time employees, your FTE count would be 15 ((10 + (20 / 2))).

There are a few ways that you can reduce your FTE count. One way is by hiring more part-time employees. Another way is by reducing the number of hours that your full-time employees work. For example, if you have 10 full-time employees who each work 40 hours per week, you could reduce their hours to 30 hours per week and still maintain the same number of FTEs.

What are the penalties for not complying with the ACA’s employer shared responsibility provision?

As of January 1, 2014, large employers (generally, those with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees) are required to offer health insurance coverage to their full-time employees or face potentially significant penalties. This employer shared responsibility provision is a key part of the Affordable Care Act’s efforts to expand access to quality, affordable health care.

Under the employer shared responsibility provision, large employers that do not offer health insurance coverage to their full-time employees may be subject to two different types of penalties:

A yearly penalty assessed on a per-employee basis for each full-time employee in excess of 30 employees; and
A monthly penalty assessed on a per-employee basis for each employee who enrolls in a qualified health plan through a Health Insurance Marketplace and who qualifies for a premium tax credit or cost-sharing reduction.

The first type of penalty, often referred to as the “no offer” penalty, applies if an employer does not offer health insurance coverage to its full-time employees (and their dependents). The second type of penalty, often referred to as the “no pay” penalty, applies if an employer offers health insurance coverage to its full-time employees but the coverage does not provide minimum value (that is, it pays less than 60 percent of the total cost of covered benefits) or is unaffordable (that is, an employee’s share of the premium exceeds 9.5 percent of his or her household income).

An employer will owe only one type of penalty even if it fails to meet both the “no offer” and “no pay” requirements.

Where can you go for more help with calculating FTEs?

There are a number of different ways to calculate FTEs, and the method you use will depend on your specific situation. If you need help calculating FTEs, there are a number of resources available to you.

The first place to start is with your human resources department. They should be able to provide you with information on how to calculate FTEs for your company. If you don’t have a human resources department, or if they are unable to help you, there are a number of online calculators that can be used.

Another great resource for calculating FTEs is the Small Business Administration website. They have a tool that can be used to calculate FTEs for small businesses.

Once you have calculated your FTEs, you will need to report this information to the government. You can do this by filing a Form 1094-C with the IRS. This form is used to report employer-provided health insurance coverage information to the government.

If you have any questions about how to calculate FTEs, or if you need help filing Form 1094-C, don’t hesitate to contact a tax professional.

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